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July 21, 2011 Print

Neutrality Not Good Enough for Gay Activists—Only Promotion Will Do

by Candi Cushman

Today, activist groups, including the National Center for Lesbian Rights, announced they filed a lawsuit against the Anoka-Hennepin School District in Minnesota. Among other things, they are demanding that the school repeal a curriculum policy directing educators to remain neutral on controversial sexual topics in the classroom.

After being invited to discuss this issue on CNN last night ( you can watch the interview here), I took a moment to review the school’s online policies against bullying and harassment, and I noticed something interesting:

The district has at least three separate policies that specifically spell out protection for sexual orientation. This includes “language” policies stipulating that students who use derogatory terms related to sexual orientation will be punished with serious consequences, which can include expulsion. (Review these policies here.)

What’s more, I noticed that in 2010, GLSEN (the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network) even sent out a press release celebrating that Anoka-Hennepin officials were among those who had adopted “effective, LGBT-inclusive anti-bullying policies.”

Furthermore, it’s important to understand that the neutrality policy deals only with curriculum—it has nothing to do with the school’s already very comprehensive anti-bullying policies. The curriculum policy simply asks educators “in the course of their professional duties” to remain “neutral” on “matters regarding sexual orientation.” It does not even ban teachers from talking about it or mentioning it in a lesson. It simply directs them to address the topic in a way that is “age-appropriate, factual and pertinent to the relevant curriculum.” (We explain more about that here.)

Given all of these facts, one is left wondering, what more do the gay activists want? It appears nothing short of taxpayer-funded schools endorsing and promoting homosexual topics in curriculum will do.   To continue reading, click here.



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  • Keith

    You not get to the core of the issue, here. Over the past two years, this school district has seen a string of student suicides. Four of those students were allegedly bullied for being gay and took their lives. I understand that as a “pro-family” organization, the most important part of the story is the part where a dangerous left-wing group attempts to invade schools to indoctrinate children, but that really isn’t even the big problem here. The problem is the tragic loss of young people’s lives thanks to relentless bullying, and for God’s sake you should at least address that fact if you actually care about children. I relinquish my soapbox.

    • Candi Cushman

      Thank you for your comment. Actually, we did in fact address this. Please review the closing paragraphs of the blog:

      “As Christians, we also strongly believe that all students—including those who identify as gay and lesbian—are valuable human beings , sacred lives, created by God who are worthy of protection. And school policies should reflect that reality.

      So we are deeply troubled by the heart-rending stories of students in this district who are experiencing horrendous bullying and harassment. Given that the school already has an extremely detailed anti-bullying policy—which makes it clear that teachers who don’t enforce the anti-bullying measures can be punished with consequences including being terminated— an important question is whether the already existent policies are being adequately and consistently enforced.”

  • Danny

    As it now goes, it won’t be long before Christians are marked out as the German Jews were in Germany and declared a danger to the state. Then, we will do what we should have done all along: preach the gospel. I pray it won’t be too late or is not, even now, too late to turn this nation around.

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