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September 26, 2011 Print

Sex: M, F, or X?

by Jeff Johnston

Australian passports will allow for a “third gender option.” The BBC reports, “Transgender people and those of ambiguous sex will be able to list their gender as indeterminate, which will be shown on passports as an X.” New Zealand has allowed passport applicants to ask for an “X” since 1995, and the United Kingdom is also currently considering allowing this option.

Countries that lump together transgender people with those born with ambiguous sex are buying into a radical transgender ideology that says there are not two, but a multitude of sexes.

When an infant is born with ambiguous or mixed sexual organs, the condition is commonly known as “intersexuality.” The medical community also calls these rare physiological anomalies “Disorders of Sex Development” or “Congenital Anomalies of the Reproductive Tract.” Not a common medical condition; one doctor estimates that about 56,000 individuals in the US are intersex, about 0.018 percent of the population.[1]

But Transgender activists use the anomalies of intersexual people to further their own agenda. Those with Disorders of Sex Development may display a combination of the two sexes, but they are not a distinct, third sex. They do not demonstrate that there are an infinite number of genders.

Congenital medical conditions are a sad result of The Fall, when sin entered the world. Intersex individuals are deserving of our love, respect and compassion. Typically their parents raise them as male or female, and most intersex individuals remain identified with the sex they were raised.

Transgenderism, or Gender Identity Disorder, on the other hand, is not usually caused by a physical problem, but is a spiritual, psychological and emotional problem.

Transgender individuals, too, deserve our respect and love, and their disorder should be treated with pastoral and psychological care. Transgender ideology is a distortion of reality, and should be treated as such, not catered to or promoted through government policies.



[1] Dr. Leonard Sax, Journal of Sex Research, “How common is intersex? A response to Anne Fausto-Sterling,” August 2002 <http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m2372/is_3_39/ai_94130313/> (accessed 27 September 2011).

 



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