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January 11, 2013 Print

Evangelical Pastor Withdraws from Presidential Inauguration

by Bethany Monk

An Evangelical pastor scheduled to give the benediction at President Obama’s second inaugural ceremony next week withdrew from participating in the event Thursday after uproar over a sermon he gave about homosexuality.

The Rev. Louie Giglio, a pastor at Passion City Church in Atlanta, Ga., preached a sermon nearly 20 years ago where he stated homosexuality is a sin, and the only way out  is “through the healing power of Jesus.”

On Wednesday, ThinkProgress, a liberal watchdog group, reported that in Giglio’s sermon, “In Search of a Standard — Christian Response to Homosexuality,” he says homosexuality is a sin, and that gay people can become straight through Christianity.

“Pastor Giglio spoke the truth,” said CitizenLink’s Gender Issues Analyst Jeff Johnston. “God designed marriage between a man and woman as the place for sexual expression — homosexual sexual behavior is outside God’s design and so is a sin. No one is born gay, and people can find freedom from homosexuality and live according to God’s plan. This is basic Christian orthodoxy about human sexuality.”

 Johnston hopes this opens people’s eye’s to where we’ve come in our culture.

“It’s a scary place — you believe God’s truth about human sexuality and marriage, and activists will work to shut you out,” he said. “Moses, Jesus and Paul believed and taught that God’s design for sexuality was marriage between a man and a woman. According to this Presidential Inaugural Committee, that would disqualify them from giving the benediction.”

FOR MORE INFORMATION
Listen to Louie Giglio’s sermon “In Search of a Standard — Christian Response to Homosexuality.”

Read “THE GIGLIO IMBROGLIO: The public inauguration of a new Moral McCarthyism.”

Read “We’re Inclusive. Except for You. And You. Oh, and You, Too.”

Read “You Want to Silence People.”



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